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Upgrade to the New Windows 11

After six years during which Windows 10 remained largely unchanged, the world’s most popular desktop operating system is getting a major overhaul with the unveiling of Windows 11.

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After six years during which Windows 10 remained largely unchanged, the world’s most popular desktop operating system is getting a major overhaul with the unveiling of Windows 11. That’s despite Microsoft proclaiming Window 10 as the last version of Windows. No matter: After a couple years of ho-hum updates, the Windows-using world—at least some of it—has something to get excited about.

That said, when we first ran the Windows 11 preview, we were surprised that it still wasn’t that different from Windows 10, despite its very new look. Not as much as we’d expected it to be, based on the screenshots we’d seen. Sure, it looks nicer with rounded corners for all windows, the taskbar icons in the middle, and more elegant Settings dialogs, but it didn’t feel totally alien or require a whole new process the way Windows 8 did.

What Are Windows 11’s Requirements and How Do You Get It?
Windows 11 will launch in late 2021—the latest scoop is that it will come out in October, though I wouldn’t be surprised if delays pushed it until later in the year. It will be a free upgrade for Windows 10 users. Pricing hasn’t been announced for non-upgrades—that is, DIY PC builds or pre-Windows 10 computers. In the meanwhile, the first beta of Windows 11 has been released via the Windows Insider Program’s Beta Channel.

Much has been made over the system requirements for Windows 11, but they’re actually very low—1GHz CPU, 4GB RAM, and 64GB storage. You’ll also need a computer with a TPM security chip and Secure Boot capability. Those are less of a problem than the internet is making them out to be, as they’ve been standard on most PCs for the last six or so years. The real limiter will be the CPU model, which needs to be from about the last four years. Microsoft recently re-released the tool that assesses your PC’s ability to run Windows 11, the PC Health Check app.

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Facebook Reveals Its Video Camera Glasses

Facebook has revealed its first pair of “smart glasses” that contain two cameras for taking photos and videos.

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Facebook has revealed its first pair of “smart glasses” that contain two cameras for taking photos and videos.

The specs, called Ray-Ban Stories, are a collaboration with the luxury eyewear brand.

Facebook is expected to release fully-fledged augmented reality (AR) spectacles.

But Facebook’s head of AR and VR told BBC Click’s Chris Fox they were still in development.

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Ford Mustang: A Brief History in Zero-to-60-MPH Acceleration

Over the years, we’ve tested a plethora of American muscle cars and have been there for each drastic refinement since the 1960s.

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Over the years, we’ve tested a plethora of American muscle cars and have been there for each drastic refinement since the 1960s. Straight-line speed is one obvious improvement. And it’s unfair to describe muscle cars as one-trick ponies, as they’ve started carving up corners at speeds unthought of even 10 years ago. But, if you’re looking at a benchmark that accurately reflects how much a single model, such as the Ford Mustang, has improved over the past few years, you can’t go wrong with the old-fashioned zero-to-60-mph time*. It’s easily relatable and comparable, unlike a skid pad number or a Nürburgring lap time.

Thanks to our extensive history of gathering our own performance data, we have decades of revealing numbers captured by our editorial staff that not only offer a unique look into a vehicle’s evolution but also serve as a performance barometer of sorts for any given era. Jump in and flip through more than five decades of Mustang acceleration numbers pulled from some of the hottest (and not so hot) performance ponies ever strapped with C/D test equipment.

*Acceleration times using 3-mph rollout, not our current rollout standard of 1 foot with the exception of the newest 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 time.

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Samsung’s Folding Phones Keep Getting Better

For a while it seemed like phones were changing designs with every new model, but for the most part, phone makers have now settled on a design. Most phones look like a big screen with no buttons on the front, and from 10 feet, it’s hard to differentiate between them.

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Photo: Shutterstock

For a while it seemed like phones were changing designs with every new model, but for the most part, phone makers have now settled on a design. Most phones look like a big screen with no buttons on the front, and from 10 feet, it’s hard to differentiate between them.

One of the benefits of settling on a design is the opportunity to have several years to improve “under the hood” features.

That’s one reason I’m impressed that Samsung has committed to the folding phone.

Samsung recently introduced the newest versions of the Galaxy Z Flip 3 5G and the Galaxy Z Fold 3 5G.

Outwardly, they look similar to last year’s models, but inside they are very much improved.

Folding screens

The Flip 3 and Fold 3 (as you might guess) are the third generation of Samsung’s folding phones.

The first generation had issues with debris getting into the screen fold, and the hinge mechanism wasn’t fully enclosed — you could see the inner workings under the screen.

This didn’t make for a very robust folding experience.

But Samsung didn’t walk away from folding phones. Instead, it doubled down, improved the design and now the third-generation folding phones are IPX8 water-resistant.

They can survive a 30-minute dunk in 5 feet of water, although Samsung still warns users about dust getting inside the hinge.

Most people want to know if the fold is visible on the screen.

The answer is yes, but depending on the view angle and what is on the screen, it does disappear.

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